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Travel Safety: Food & Drink

Let’s be real: One of the best things about travelling is trying all the food!

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But there are certain safety measures you should keep in mind when ordering and eating abroad. The following list of foods and drinks to eat and to avoid is provided by the CDC, and more information can be found here: CDC Food and Water Safety Resources for Travelers. Continue reading “Travel Safety: Food & Drink”

Be A Heart-Healthy Dawg

February is Heart Health Awareness Month – the perfect time to start working toward heart health goals!  There are many ways to maintain a healthy heart. Below, we have listed just a few.

For more heart health information, visit the University Health Center’s Heart Health Fair on February 7, 2018 – 11am-3pm at UHC. This event is hosted in collaboration with the American Red Cross. You can sign up to give blood here using code “UGA.”

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Continue reading “Be A Heart-Healthy Dawg”

Expert Flu Tips for Dawgs

Flu season is upon us. At the University Health Center we are, as you can imagine, seeing many cases of the flu every day.  I want to offer some simple steps you can take to keep yourself and the UGA community healthy.

Prevent the Flu

  1. Get a flu shot. The best way to prevent the flu is to be immune to the viruses. If you haven’t gotten a flu shot yet, you should still get one.
  2. Practice good hand hygiene by either hand washing with soap and water or by using alcohol-based gels.
  3. Do not touch your face, eyes or mouth unless your hands are clean.
  4. Cover your nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing. An uncovered cough or sneeze can project respiratory droplets 3 to 6 feet or more.

2017 Flu (Bus)

Treating the Flu

The flu is a contagious disease that is caused by one of many influenza viruses. It primarily attacks the respiratory tract (nose, throat and lungs). The flu usually comes on suddenly and may include these symptoms: fever, headache, tiredness, dry cough, sore throat, nasal congestion, body aches and insomnia.

  1. Stay home if you are sick. A good rule of thumb if you have the flu is that you should stay home as long as you have a fever. You can return to school or work if you are fever-free for at least 24 hours without using fever reducing medicines.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing. Wash your hands after coughing or sneezing.
  3. If you live in a residence hall, consider going to your permanent home until you have recovered.
  4. Take medication to relieve the symptoms of flu.
  5. Drink plenty of liquids.
  6. Avoid using alcohol and tobacco.
  7. Rest.

For more information about the flu, getting a flu shot and when to seek a health care provider, visit the University Health Center’s Influenza site.

For more flu information from a student perspective, check out What’s Your Flu I.Q.?!

UGA students can schedule University Health Center primary medical care appointments online at www.uhs.uga.edu, using the UHC Patient Portal.

Written by: Dr. Jean Chin, University Health Center Executive Director
The University Health Center does not endorse any products or services that may appear in ads below.

Top 8 Reasons to Give Blood

1. You will get juice and cookies.

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2. It’s easy and convenient. 

It only takes about an hour to give whole blood, and you can make your donation at an American Red Cross blood donation center or one of many blood drives (including one at the UGA Health Center on February 6, 2019 – sign up using code “UGA”) held at businesses, community centers, schools, or places of worship. Continue reading “Top 8 Reasons to Give Blood”

Who Should I Talk To?

Sexual Assault Resources at UGA: Confidential vs. Non-Confidential

No one should ever have to experience sexual assault, but it does happen. And it can be incredibly difficult to deal with your everyday life and the trauma afterwards.

It can also be difficult to navigate the different resources that are available on campus at the University of Georgia. An important first step is to know who you can speak to confidentially, as the majority of faculty and staff on campus are required to report information about sexual assault to University officials.

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Continue reading “Who Should I Talk To?”

Healthy Dawg’s Orientation “How To”

So you’ve made it to UGA…Congratulations!

We’re excited to welcome you to the Bulldog family and want to make sure that you have a smooth transition (and that you’re able to register for classes on time!). Here are just a few things to keep in mind…

IMG_5225 Continue reading “Healthy Dawg’s Orientation “How To””

Welcome Letter for New Dawgs

Dear Families,

On behalf of the University Health Center, welcome to the Bulldawg Nation!  As the campus medical home for the University of Georgia students, we endorse behaviors that support total health: the physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, social, and environmental aspects of health.

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Our mascot, Healthy Dawg, is juggling all the areas of health – just like we want to help UGA students do!

 

Continue reading “Welcome Letter for New Dawgs”

Student Perspective: Positive Experience as Part of SHAC

SHAC: a four letter acronym that represents health advocacy for all students at the University of Georgia. The UGA University Health Center is a student-centered facility that offers exceptional health care services to the students and faculty at UGA. It is incredibly comforting for UGA students to know that there is a health care facility focused on the needs of students nestled in the heart of the UGA community. It is also safe to say that at the University Health Center, we strive to keep our Georgia Bulldogs healthy!SHAC-group-2016-17b

Continue reading “Student Perspective: Positive Experience as Part of SHAC”

Sexual Health Services at UHC

Whether you are sexually active right now or not, the University Health Center spends a lot of time meeting with students to answer their questions about sexual health. A good rule of thumb is to come in annually for an exam or physical and be open and honest with your provider about your sexual behaviors. For women, the “Well Women’s Exam” is the perfect time to check in about contraceptive options and changes in PMS, cramping, and bleeding patterns. The CDC recommends annual testing for chlamydia and gonorrhea for all sexually active adults under 26. For men who have sex with men, annual syphilis and HIV testing should also be discussed.

Ask any kind of question about your sexual health in a totally judgement-free environment.

Continue reading “Sexual Health Services at UHC”

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